The March To Independence - A Timeline of the American Revolution

The March To Independence – A Timeline of the American Revolution

It’s a pivotal time in world history. The American Revolution is underway and the fate of the colonies hangs in the balance. This blog post will provide a timeline of events for our March to Independence starting from the lead up to the Revolution and the subsequent formation of the United States. From the Stamp Act to the ratification of the Bill of Rights, this is an era fraught with political intrigue and social turmoil. So let’s take a closer look at what led to America’s independence!

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In 1765, the Stamp Act was passed by the British Parliament, causing an uproar in the colonies. This act placed a tax on all printed materials, including newspapers, pamphlets, and legal documents. The colonists argued that they should not be taxed without representation in Parliament. Tensions between the colonists and British authorities continued to mount, culminating in the Boston Massacre of 1770. This event further inflamed anti-British sentiment in the colonies and solidified support for independence among many Americans.

The first shots of the Revolutionary War were fired at Lexington and Concord in April of 1775. From there, the war raged on for six long years. Finally, in 1781, a decisive victory at Yorktown signaled the end of major hostilities. However, the war would not officially end until the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783. This treaty recognized the United States as a free and independent nation.

In 1787, delegates from all thirteen states gathered in Philadelphia to draft a new Constitution for the United States. After much debate and compromise, the Constitution was ratified by the required number of states in 1788. In 1791, the Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution, ensuring certain basic rights and liberties for all Americans.


Timeline of events on the March To Independence:

1764, April 5 – The Sugar Act is passed by the British Parliament, which imposes a tax on sugar and other goods imported into the colonies.

1764, September 1: The currency act is passed, which prohibits the colonies from printing their own money.

1765, March 22: The Stamp Act is passed by the British Parliament, causing an uproar in the colonies.

1765, March 24: The Quartering Act is passed, which requires the colonies to provide housing and food for British troops.

1765, August: The Sons of Liberty, a secret society, is formed to oppose British rule. They were led by Samuel Adams and included leaders such as Patrick Henry and John Hancock and were instrumental in organizing resistance to British policies as well as conducting espionage against the British military.

1766, March 18: The Stamp Act is repealed, but the colonists are angered by the Declaratory Act, which states that Parliament has the right to pass laws binding the colonies “in all cases whatsoever.”

1767, November 20: The Townshend Acts went into effect, placing taxes on a variety of imported goods.

1768: The colonists begin a boycott of British goods in protest of the Townshend Acts.

1768, April: The Secretary of State for the Colonies, Lord Hillsborough, issues a decree forbidding governors of the colonies to call assemblies without prior approval from London and stop the circulation of pamphlets that are critical of British policies.

1768, September 28: British ships arrive in Boston with troops to quell the unrest caused by the boycotts.

1769, May 16: The Virginia House of Burgesses adopts The Virginia Resolves, which declare that the colonists have a right to self-government and are not bound by Parliament’s decisions without their consent to include levying taxes. On May 19th, the Virginia governor dissolves the House of Burgesses in response to the Virginia Resolves.

1770, March 5: The Boston Massacre takes place, in which British troops open fire on a crowd of protesters, killing five colonists.

1770, April: Parliament repeals the Townshend Acts to ease tensions with the colonies. All acts except for the tax on tea are repealed.

1771, May 15/16: The regulator movement began in 1766 in response to the grossly corrupt officials in Orange County, North Carolina. Regulators from several counties converged on Hillsborough to demand reforms. Royal Governor William Tryon called out the militia to quell the uprising, but the regulators refused to disperse. Violence broke out and several people were killed on both sides. This event is seen as one of the first instances of armed resistance to British authority in the colonies.

1772, June: The Gaspee, a British ship enforcing the Revenue Act of 1764, runs aground off of Rhode Island. A group of colonists row out to the ship and set it on fire.

1772: The committees of correspondence are established in the colonies. They are secret networks that allow colonists to communicate with one another about resistance to British policies. Samual Adams, in response to the Gaspee incident, helps establish the committee of correspondence in Massachusetts.

1773, May 10: The Tea Act is passed, leading to the Boston Tea Party on December 16th, in which colonists dump 342 chests of tea into Boston Harbor to protest the tax on tea.

1774, May 20: The Coercive Acts (Intolerable Acts) are passed by Parliament in response to the Boston Tea Party. The Acts close Boston Harbor and revoke the colonists’ right to self-government.

1774, September: The First Continental Congress convenes in Philadelphia. Delegates from all of the colonies except Georgia attend. They adopt the Continental Association, which calls for a boycott of British goods if the Coercive Acts are not repealed. The First Continental Congress disbanded on October 26th.

1775, April 19: The first shots of the Revolutionary War are fired at Lexington and Concord. The “shot heard round the world” signals the start of the War for Independence.

1775, May 10: The Green Mountain Boys, led by Ethan Allen, capture Fort Ticonderoga from the British. This event is seen as a turning point in the Revolution, as it provides the colonists with much-needed supplies and weapons and disrupted the communications and transportation of the British.

1775, June 17: The Battle of Bunker Hill takes place. Although the British win the battle, they suffer heavy losses, which encourages the colonists and shows them that they can fight against the British army.

1776, January 10: Thomas Paine publishes “Common Sense,” which calls for American independence from Britain. It laid out the moral and political case for independence in clear and concise terms. This pamphlet was instrumental in convincing many colonists to support the cause of independence.

1776, July 4: The Declaration of Independence is adopted by the Second Continental Congress. This document, penned by Thomas Jefferson, declares the colonies’ independence from Britain and sets forth the principles upon which the United States would be founded.

1776, August 27: The Battle of Long Island (also known as the Battle of Brooklyn) is fought. It is the largest battle of the Revolutionary War and the first major engagement between the British and Continental armies. The British win the battle, but General George Washington is defeated but able to retreat and eventually regroup his army.

1776, September 22: Nathan Hale is hanged by the British for spying. His last words, “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country,” become a rallying cry for the Patriot cause.

1776, October 11: Benedict Arnold’s victory at Valcour Island on Lake Champlain delays the British advance southward. This victory gives the Americans time to regroup and prepare for the British attack.

1776, November 16: The Battle of Fort Washington is fought. It is a decisive British victory, as they capture over two thousand American soldiers. This defeat leads to the withdrawal of the Continental Army from New York City.

1776, December 19: The Crisis, written by Thomas Paine, is published. This pamphlet encourages the Americans to persevere in their fight for independence, as he argues that they are fighting for a just and noble cause.

1777, January 3: The Battle of Princeton is fought. It is a small but significant American victory, as it boosts morale and provides much-needed supplies for the Continental Army.

1777, September 11: The Battle of Brandywine is fought. It is a British victory, but it comes at a high cost, as the British suffer over two thousand casualties. This battle is seen as a turning point in the war, as it signals the British resolve to continue fighting despite their losses.

1777, September 19 and October 7: The Battle of Saratoga is fought, leading to France’s entry into the war on the side of the Americans. This turning point in the war leads to British defeat and eventually, American independence.

1777, November 15: The Articles of Confederation are adopted by the Continental Congress. This document, which would serve as the basis for the Constitution, outlines the structure of the new government of the United States. The Articles of Confederation were eventually ratified on March 1, 1781.

1778, February 6: The Treaty of Amity and Commerce and the Treaty of Alliance were signed between France and the United States. These treaties formalize the alliance between the two countries and mark a turning point in the war.

1778, June 28: The Battle of Monmouth is fought. It is an American victory, but it comes at a high cost, as over one thousand American soldiers are killed or wounded.

1779, June 1: As The Revolutionary War continues, Thomas Jefferson is elected as the governor of Virginia. He serves in this role until June 1781.

1779, June 23: The Virginia Assembly votes to confiscate all property owned by British citizens. This action is taken in retaliation for the confiscation of American property by the British government.

1779, June 23: John Paul Jones, an American naval hero, captures the British ship HMS Serapis. This victory is a turning point in the war at sea, as it proves that the American navy can compete with the British.

1780: The Revolutionary War continues with the British capturing Charleston and Cornwallis beating Gates at Camden.

1781: Starts with Greene beating Cornwallis at The Battle of Guilford Courthouse and the British taking Williamsburg. The French then enter the Chesapeake Bay and trap Cornwallis at Yorktown.

1781, September 28: The Battle of Yorktown is fought. It is a decisive American victory, as the British are forced to surrender. This victory leads to the end of the Revolutionary War and the independence of the United States.

1783, September 3: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the Revolutionary War. This treaty recognizes the independence of the United States and establishes its borders.

1784, January 14: The Continental Congress ratifies the Treaty of Paris. This act formally ends the Revolutionary War and establishes the United States as a free and independent nation.

1785, January 11: The Congress relocates to New York City, which becomes the new capital of the United States. This move is made to be closer to the center of trade and commerce.

1786, August – 1787, February: Shay’s Rebellion occurs, in which farmers in Massachusetts protest high taxes and debt. This rebellion is seen as a warning of the potential for violence if the new government is not able to address the needs of its citizens.

1787, September 17: The Constitution of the United States is signed by the delegates to the Constitutional Convention. This document outlines the structure of the new government and establishes the United States as a federal republic.

1788, June 21: New Hampshire becomes the ninth state to ratify the Constitution, making it the official document of the United States.

1789, April 30: George Washington is inaugurated as the first President of the United States. This event marks the beginning of the new federal government.

1789, September 25: The United States Bill of Rights is ratified. This document outlines the rights and liberties of American citizens

1789, March 4: The first Congress of the United States meets in New York City. This event marks the beginning of the American government as it is known today.

1789, April 30: George Washington is inaugurated as the first President of the United States. This event marks the beginning of the new federal government.

1790, May 29: Rhode Island becomes the last of the thirteen colonies to ratify the Constitution, making it the official document of the United States.

1790, December 6: The United States capital is moved from New York City to Philadelphia.

1791, December 15: The Bill of Rights is ratified and added to the Constitution, ensuring certain basic rights and liberties for all Americans.

1791 – 1792: The Whiskey Rebellion occurs in Pennsylvania. This rebellion is a response to the federal government’s tax on whiskey. It is put down by the use of force by the federal government.

1792, February 13: All of the Electoral College votes are counted and George Washington is unanimously elected for a second term as President of the United States.

In summary, the years 1765-1792 were marked by many important events in American history. These years saw the establishment of the United States as an independent nation, the adoption of the Constitution, and the beginning of the new federal government. These years were also marked by some challenges, such as rebellions and economic difficulties. However, overall, these years laid the foundation for the future growth and development of the United States.


Frequently Asked Questions about the American Revolution:

How many colonists died in the American Revolution?

Approximately 25,000 – 75,000 colonists died during the Revolutionary War. This includes soldiers who were killed in battle, as well as civilians who died as a result of the war.

How many British died in the American Revolution?

Approximately 20,000 – 25,000 British soldiers died during the Revolutionary War. This includes soldiers who were killed in battle, as well as those who died from disease or other causes.

Who were the Patriots in the American Revolution?

The Patriots were those colonists who supported the American Revolution. This included those who fought in the Continental Army, as well as those who provided supplies and other support to the army.

Who were the Loyalists in the American Revolution?

The Loyalists were those colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolution. Many of them left the United States after the war and settled in Canada.

What were some of the causes of the American Revolution?

There were many causes of the American Revolution, including economic, political, and social factors. One of the main causes was the colonists’ belief that they were not being treated fairly by the British government. They felt that they deserved the same rights and liberties as the people living in Britain. Another cause was the economic pressure that the colonists were under due to high taxes. The colonists also felt that they were not represented fairly in the British government. These and other factors led to the outbreak of the American Revolution.

What were some of the major events of the American Revolution?

Some of the major events of the American Revolution include the Boston Tea Party, the Battle of Bunker Hill, the Declaration of Independence, and the Battle of Yorktown. These and other events helped to secure the American colonists’ victory in the war and their independence from Britain.

What was the outcome of the American Revolution?

The outcome of the American Revolution was the independence of the United States from Britain. The war also resulted in a new form of government for the United States, based on the principles of liberty and democracy. These principles would later be enshrined in the Constitution of the United States. Finally, the American Revolution resulted in a new sense of national identity for the people of the United States. This new nation would go on to become the most powerful nation in the world.

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