The Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment: The Brutal Torture of Those Who Didn't Believe in Communism

The Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment: The Brutal Torture of Those Who Didn’t Believe in Communism

The Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment: The Brutal Torture of Those Who Didn’t Believe in Communism

Photo Credit: ‘The Anti-Humans’ and the Pitesti Prison in Romania

In the early days of Romania’s communist history, the Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment was conducted. This brutal experiment was designed to force people into believing in the communist ideology and those that didn’t were tortured mercilessly. The prison was home to intellectuals, Christians, and laypeople who refused to accept communism as the only way forward. In this article, we will explore the history of the Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment and discuss some of the methods that were used to torture those who didn’t believe.

In 1947 the Romanian Communist Party, led by Nicolae Ceaușescu, seized power through a bloodless coup. However, after the coup, the Communists were so determined to stamp out any dissent within the country they instituted a series of policies designed to force people into compliance. One of these policies was the reeducation of those who did not believe in communism.

Reeducation camps were used to torture and break down individuals and then rebuild them into loyal communists and the Pitești Prison may have been the most horrific of all these reeducation camps. The Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment began in 1949 and ended in 1951. A total of 12,000 inmates were tortured during this time. Of those, only 300 survived. The rest either died or went insane.

The Communists used many methods of torture at the Pitești Prison. One method was known as “The Pit.” This was a small hole in the ground that prisoners were forced to stand in for hours at a time. Another method was known as “The Wheel.” This was a large wheel that prisoners were strapped to and then beaten with clubs. Other methods included electric shock, starvation, and solitary confinement.

The torture was carried out by the prison guards and the “reeducated” inmates alike. These inmates were known as “trustees” and they were given special privileges in exchange for their compliance. These privileges included extra food, cigarettes, and access to the prison library. After inmates were broken down and agreed to sign a statement saying that they believed in communism, they were considered “re-educated”.

The methods of torture used at the Pitești Prison were so brutal that even the guards who carried out the orders began to have doubts about what they were doing. Many of them became depressed and some even committed suicide.

Even though the full outcome of the Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment is unknown, one thing is certain: the communist government committed atrocities against those who refused to believe in their ideology.

The communist government denied that the Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment ever took place. They claimed that it was a figment of the imagination of those who opposed communism. However, there is evidence that suggests otherwise.

Did you know about the Pitești Prison Reeducation Experiment? What do you think about it? Let us know in the comments! 

Thank you for reading, and be sure to check out our other blog posts for more information on subject such as – The Montauk Project: The U.S. Government’s Top-Secret Program Conducting Experiments on Humans.



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